Xerox Corp.

Staying On Top, Down Under
May 1, 1998

Australian in-plant managers joined with quick printers for the first conference of its kind in Australia. Some things are the same everywhere. One can travel halfway around the world, for example, and still hear about the importance of good service and good communication in a printing operation. Those two themes popped up repeatedly at Pacific Print Congress 98, held recently in Melbourne, Australia. Speakers, both American and Australian, stressed that, in a sea of competition, customers are looking for vendors they can trust; vendors who will go that extra step for them. "Become consultants to these people, not just order takers,"

Color Printing Proves Prosperous
May 1, 1998

Four-color jobs, both offset and digital, make up half of the Exxon in-plant's workload. AFTER THE Valdez oil spill leaked almost 11 million gallons of North Slope crude oil onto the Alaska coastline in early 1989, Exxon admirably wasted no time diving into the cleanup and recovery effort. During that process, communicating with government agencies and other outside interests was of crucial importance. Houston's Exxon Print Center was the ready for the task. Boasting 27 employees and a wealth of sheetfed presses, digital printers and bindery equipment, the in-plant printed manuals and brochures filled with four-color pictures chronicling the three-year

The Coming Of The Digital Dynasty
April 1, 1998

In-plants all over the country have gone digital and are enjoying a host of big benefits. Here's a look at what they like—and what they'd like to see—in their systems. "DIGITAL PRINTING, while convenient, can never match the quality of traditional offset." Sound familiar? It does to proponents of digital printing systems. They have heard this argument plenty of times before. And, in their opinion, it's an argument without merit. "It's very high-quality printing," says Meredith's Bob Furstenau of his IBM InfoColor 70. "It's very comparable to offset." And in some cases, even better. Furstenau, director of digital content management for the

Big Plant On Campus
March 1, 1998

Already one of the country's largest in-plants, Louisiana State University's Graphic and Mailing Services just got bigger, with a new facility and expanded capabilities. Louisiana State University's Graphic and Mailing Services never need worry about a shortage of customers. The Baton Rouge-based in-plant exists on a campus full of faculty and staff who are obligated to use its copying, printing and mailing services. Still, Michael K. Loyd, director, is not content with a captive customer base. He wants to be the university's preferred—not mandatory—printer. "Although departments must come to us, we would like to be their printer of choice," he says. "We want

Behind Bars: Doing Press Time
February 1, 1998

Managers of prison in-plants must deal with tight security, regulated hours, high turnover and endless training—and still put out quality work on time. When the metal doors lock behind you, and you step into the wind-swept courtyard, edged with guard towers and razor wire, you know you're in prison. Heavily tattooed men with matted ponytails leap and shuffle on the basketball court, shooting curious glances as you pass. Others play handball or work out with weights, all of them eyeing you, sizing you up. Overhead, guards in sunglasses stare down from their towers with stoic faces, their rifles ready. No false

Behind Bars - Doing Press Time
February 1, 1998

Managers of prison in-plants must deal with tight security, regulated hours, high turnover and endless training—and still put out quality work on time. by Bob Neubauer When the metal doors lock behind you, and you step into the wind-swept courtyard, edged with guard towers and razor wire, you know you're in prison. Heavily tattooed men with matted ponytails leap and shuffle on the basketball court, shooting curious glances as you pass. Others play handball or work out with weights, all of them eyeing you, sizing you up. Overhead, guards in sunglasses stare down from their towers with stoic faces, their rifles ready.

How To Evaluate Your Shop
February 1, 1998

Want to increase productivity while reducing waste and costs? Read on to see if a direct digital color device is the right choice for you. Before his in-plant purchased a Xerox DocuColor 40, Dennis Moran had to send out most of his color work. "We would have to go to press and send the plates out to be made for just 40 to 50 copies or so," says Moran, supervisor of electronic printing at Guardian Life in New York. "Now, we're able to offer a lot more in four-color in less time than it would take to put on the press." For example,

Xplor Heats Up Dallas
January 1, 1998

Dallas was cold, but the topics were hot at Xplor's 18th annual document systems conference. Have you gotten any advertising postcards in the mail lately? Any brochures or newsletters? Bet you have. And I bet you tossed some of them with barely a glance. But what if, during that glance, you spotted your name? And what if, instead of useless, generic topics, the copy was about one of your main interests? You'd read it, wouldn't you? We're talking about targeted marketing, using variable data. It's nothing new. Nothing profound. But it may be something you hadn't thought your shop could provide.