Marvin Shimabukuro

Bob has served as editor of In-plant Impressions since October of 1994. Prior to that he served for three years as managing editor of Printing Impressions, a commercial printing publication. Mr. Neubauer is very active in the U.S. in-plant industry. He attends all the major in-plant conferences and has visited nearly 170 in-plant operations around the world. He has given presentations to numerous in-plant groups in the U.S., Canada and Australia, including the Association of College and University Printers and the In-plant Printing and Mailing Association. He also coordinates the annual In-Print contest, cosponsored by IPMA and In-plant Impressions.

In-plants all over the country have gone digital and are enjoying a host of big benefits. Here's a look at what they like—and what they'd like to see—in their systems. "DIGITAL PRINTING, while convenient, can never match the quality of traditional offset." Sound familiar? It does to proponents of digital printing systems. They have heard this argument plenty of times before. And, in their opinion, it's an argument without merit. "It's very high-quality printing," says Meredith's Bob Furstenau of his IBM InfoColor 70. "It's very comparable to offset." And in some cases, even better. Furstenau, director of digital content management for the

Managers of prison in-plants must deal with tight security, regulated hours, high turnover and endless training—and still put out quality work on time. by Bob Neubauer When the metal doors lock behind you, and you step into the wind-swept courtyard, edged with guard towers and razor wire, you know you're in prison. Heavily tattooed men with matted ponytails leap and shuffle on the basketball court, shooting curious glances as you pass. Others play handball or work out with weights, all of them eyeing you, sizing you up. Overhead, guards in sunglasses stare down from their towers with stoic faces, their rifles ready.

Managers of prison in-plants must deal with tight security, regulated hours, high turnover and endless training—and still put out quality work on time. When the metal doors lock behind you, and you step into the wind-swept courtyard, edged with guard towers and razor wire, you know you're in prison. Heavily tattooed men with matted ponytails leap and shuffle on the basketball court, shooting curious glances as you pass. Others play handball or work out with weights, all of them eyeing you, sizing you up. Overhead, guards in sunglasses stare down from their towers with stoic faces, their rifles ready. No false

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